Record TV Shows Without a DVR Using the iView Converter Box

I dumped cable several years ago and use a digital antenna with my Panasonic Smart TV to watch all local channels (ABC, NBC, MeTV, etc.). I also have a subscription to Netflix. Everything was going great until MeTV moved Perry Mason to 9:00AM Eastern (from 10:00AM). That threw me off my morning schedule.

Due to a momentary lapse in sanity, I considered getting basic cable with a DVR, which would have given me a $30 monthly bill. Fortunately, I found a solution for a one-time payment of $29. It works perfectly with equipment I already had.

At this writing, this solution did not work on my Smart TV, but commenters on Amazon said they were able to make it work.

iView Converter Box records TV shows

Here’s How

Test the Signal. Based on your home’s location such as the proximity to the towers, trees around, etc., you may get lots of channels, a few, or none. This site supposedly allows you to find out, but it didn’t work for me. It said no channels were available in my Zip Code, but I have plenty. My advice is to buy a good antenna, run the scan, and test it yourself.

iView Digital Converter Box. This converter box is designed to record programs that it receives through an HD antenna. I thought I’d be able to use the converter box on my Smart TV, but that didn’t work (others have reported that they’ve been able to get it to work on a Smart TV). Fortunately, I have an old analog color TV that works great. (This unit also works on HDTVs, but I wasn’t able to get it to work on my Smart TV. Others reported success with that, however.)

Here is a newer version of this converter box, but it still doesn’t offer the weekday recording option, and it costs a little more (I unplug my external hard drive on the weekends so it won’t record). Reading through the reviews, the only improvement is the layout of the remote control (which needed that!).

Digital Antenna. The above image shows an antenna plugged into the iView Digital Converter. I also connected an external hard drive to the converter since it doesn’t provide storage. I have two antennas, and here is a link to the newest one.

External Hard Drive. I’ve scheduled the recordings of Perry Mason at 9:00-10:00AM and again at 11:30PM-12:30AM. There is no option to choose weekdays, so I had to choose daily (I hope a future software update will add weekday option). I have the 1TB hard drive, and here is a link to the newer 2 TB unit.)

Extra USB Cable. I like watching the show on the big screen (my Smart TV) so I have to unplug the external hard drive from the iView and plug it into a USB port on the side of the Smart TV. My TV is mounted, so this isn’t convenient. I bought the extra USB cable that works with my hard drive and leave one in the iView and one in the Smart TV. No more fumbling to reach the USB port.

On my Smart TV, I simply plug the external hard drive into the USB cable that I leave in the TV, open the Media Center, go to Videos, and click to play any scheduled recording.

The iView Digital Converter box has other functions such as pause when playing. Check out all the details and reviews on Amazon.

Let me know what you think by leaving a comment below. Or if you have alternate solutions, let us know.

PEACE.

 

 

 

Which Files Should You Back Up?

If anything ever happens and I have to recover data saved on my computer, I want it to be as painless as possible. That’s why I paid attention to which files I should protect and how.

A backup is not a backup if it’s not off site. To simplify offsite/online storage, I use MozyPro. This technology backs up designated files to an online vault every day as they change on my computer. MozyPro. proved to be the best service for me because it keeps my files organized the way I have them on my computer (this is a biggie for me). My external hard drive also provides automatic backups (it’s also backed up by MozyPro). And I have critical files saved on a 4GB thumb drive for easy access when I’m offline and traveling. In addition to having the means to back up your data, you should also have a plan for knowing what to back up.

UPDATE 1/22/2012: I’ve switched to Carbonite. I wanted to start fresh, but both services are great. 

My Documents Folder: My two main business folders are separated into broad categories, then into smaller subcategories. If you keep like subjects together, it’s easier to back up everything (and to find anything I need later).

Outlook Files: You can back up Outlook to include your contacts, emails, calendar, tasks, and journal entries. (See my post on backing up Outlook. The path to my Outlook files is at C:Documents and SettingsPeggy DuncanLocal SettingsApplication DataMicrosoftOutlook). You’ll want to back up the Outlook.pst file.) 

UPDATE 1/22/2012: In Windows 7, the path is  C:UsersYourComputerNameAppDataLocalMicrosoftOutlookOutlook.pst (replace YourComputerName with your own).

You’ll probably also want to back up your signature files and rules if you’ve set them up. The path to the Signatures folder is C:Documents and SettingsyournameApplication DataMicrosoftSignatures (MozyPro keeps this folder backed up for me).

And if you’ve created any rules, you’ll want to back them up too (see my post on backing up Outlook. To find out where your templates are stored, in Word, click the Tools menu, Options, File Locations tab. Double-click the location that reads User Templates.

Templates: If you create any templates (with the .dot, .xlt, .ppt extensions), they’re automatically saved outside of the My Documents structure (mine are at C:Documents and SettingsPeggy DuncanApplication DataMicrosoftTemplates). I added this location to my Favorites so it would be easy to remember.

UPDATE: In Windows 7, it’s difficult if not impossible to find the Templates folder. Let the system find it for you. Hold down the Windows key (the one with the Windows logo left of the spacebar) and type R. The Run command box will appear. Paste this in that box, C:UsersYourComputerNameAppDataRoamingMicrosoftTemplatesTemplates replacing YourComputerName with your own, and click OK.

Downloaded Programs: These are miscellaneous applications I’ve either purchased or downloaded for free. I don’t have the CD. Instead of saving these in the same folder as the Programs folder, I put them in a separate folder called My Downloaded Programs. If I have to restore my computer files, I won’t have to remember which applications I downloaded.

My Books: These are all the files I have for all the books I’ve written. I keep these outside of my main business files folder and off my computer because the files are so large.

QuickBooks: In addition to being backed up on my external hard drive and online vault every day, I back QuickBooks files up on my hard drive every time I make changes (QuickBooks has this feature built in. Every time it asks you if you want to back up, click YES! I name the file the same each time so it also gets backed up online).

Favorites. I’ve bookmarked some great sites and don’t want to lose the easy access. To find where your Favorites are stored, double-click My Computer, double-click the C: Drive, double-click Documents and Settings, double-click on your username folder. You should see your Favorites folder.

Pictures. Pictures I use on my Website are safe on the Web server. All others are saved in the My Pictures folder.

Special Projects. I’m working on my family tree with the software Family Tree Maker.

In addition to being backed up on my external hard drive and online vault every day, I also saved them to a flash drive that I keep with me.

I must admit that I’m somewhat anal about backing up my data. My computer is my livelihood, and I don’t want to lose over 10 years worth of business. Plus, I cannot tell you how much better I sleep at night because I’ve taken the time to put this plan in place.

Simplify your life, and make data recovery one less thing you have to worry about. If you don’t think you have time to deal with this now, how will you find time to recover later?

P.S. Learn how to organize your files in my eBook, Get Organized So You Can Think! Word templates that I created that will make this easy and also a File Index to get you started are attached.

Related Posts
Use Technology to Protect Your Small Business from Disaster
My Laptop Crashed but I Didn’t Panic
September is National Preparedness Month
Back Up All of Outlook Pleeaaze!

Peggy Duncan, Personal Productivity Expert