Keep Your Overloaded Inbox Under Control

I just got back from presenting my most popular seminar, “Conquer Email Overload with Outlook,” at a conference of magazine editors. If you think you have email issues, try being the editor of a popular magazine! They receive tons of irrelevant email from public relations companies and individuals trying to get press.

I have tons of ways to manage email overload in my book, Conquer Email Overload, and here in this blog. Here is one I suggested to this group.

Keep Messages Separate
Use two email addresses…one for the Web (don’t make it clickable). It’ll read like this: editor (a(t) xyzco.com. Then create a rule in Outlook that sends all this email to a special folder as soon as it gets to your Inbox. (There is no valid argument for putting your clickable email address on the Web. Spam will continue to be a huge problem if you do because spambots crawl sites looking for the @ symbol. They’ll find it inside PDFs too.)

You can use this same email address on your business card.

You could also consider not including this email address in your regular Send/Receive. You’ll have to manually check email coming to this address…maybe have a routine to do it once or twice a week…deleting immediately and not letting them pile up.

Consider getting rid of the email address that’s “out there” too much. It won’t be the end of the world…just do it and start over. For the editors, I also recommended setting this new email address up with an autoresponder that returns a message that explains what their publication is about, what makes a good story, the best way to submit a query or deliver a pitch, and a link to their Webpage that explains more. They’ll also put this email address inside the publication instead of their main address.

For the second email address, use it internally, give it to the PR people who always send you relevant press, and to other important people in your life (like me).

And that’s it!

PEACE.

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