Outlook 2010 – Make All Email Accounts Go to Main Inbox (with video)

By Default, Outlook 2010 creates separate Inboxes for each of your email accounts. The question of how to fix this comes up a lot in my training sessions, so I created this video that I hope will ease your frustrations and save you some time…every second needs to count.

The first part of the video shows you what to do if you’ve already created the email POP account in Outlook. Toward the end of the video (1:48), I show you how to set up the POP email account the way you want it in the first place.

NOTE: Instructions don’t work for IMAP accounts. This might be an issue for you if you need to synchronize email across multiple machines. Also note that if you try to use a rule to move the email to a .pst folder, you’ll be removing it from IMAP.

PEACE.

How to Email Calendar Dates from Outlook 2010 for Others to View (with video)

People on the same Microsoft Exchange Server can view each other’s calendars. If you’re not that fortunate and you need to schedule a meeting with an individual or group, here’s an option for you.
Pick possible meeting days on your calendar and send a miniature version of it to the coordinator. (This command works the same in earlier versions of Outlook.)

Note: A free online option for scheduling group meetings is at www.MeetingWizard.com.

PEACE.

How to Make All Outlook 2010 Emails Come Into One (Your Main) Inbox (video)

By Default, Outlook 2010 is set up to create separate Inboxes for each of your email accounts. The question of how to fix this comes up a lot in my training sessions, so I created this video that I hope will ease your frustrations and save you some time…every second needs to count.

The first part of the video shows you what to do if you’ve already created the email account in Outlook (instructions only work for POP email accounts, not IMAP). At the end of the video, I show you how to set up the email account the way you want it in the first place. If you don’t see the Change Folder option as indicated in the video, see the note below.

NOTE: Instructions don’t work for IMAP accounts. This might be an issue for you if you need to synchronize email across multiple machines. Also note that if you try to use a rule to move the email to a .pst folder, you’ll be removing it from IMAP.

Five Reasons I Knew the Email was SPAM – Phishing – Spoofing

I just received an email message that, at first glance, looked like it came from account@FedEx.com (the sender had altered their URL, which is called spoofing). I was immediately suspicious, and didn’t click the embedded link they’d warned me to check out.

Here are five reasons why I Shift+Deleted this message (holding down the Shift key when you press Delete bypasses the Deleted Items folder in Outlook. The message leaves my computer permanently).

  • Salutation. They didn’t address me by name or company. Instead, it read “Greetings from FedEx!”.
  • Hyperlink. The URL they wanted me to click wasn’t fedex.com. Instead, it started with “http://www.netkreds…”
  • Junk Folder. Outlook had detected it as spam and sent it to the junk folder. I’m a FedEx customer and receive emails from them every month, so Outlook should have recognized them.
  • Certain words. The message included the words, “personal information.” My radar went way up when I saw that and thought phishing (a way of attempting to acquire sensitive information such as usernames and credit card details by masquerading as a legitimate entity).
  • Grammar. The message had bad grammar and punctuation. I think better of the real FedEx.com, and didn’t think they’d send a message like this.

The Message

Here is the full message. I’ve indicated the grammar in question by marketing it red.

“During our regularly scheduled account maintenance and verification procedures, we have detected a slight error in your account information. This might be due to either of the following reasons:

1. A recent updates in our SSL server ( Due to slightly problem ) 2. A recent change in your personal information ( i.e. change of address).

Please update and verify your information by clicking or enter the following URL in your browser: ….

If your account information is not updated within 48 hours then your ability to access your account will become restricted.

Disclaimer:

This message was created by FedEx Webship/Corporateship, a product of FedEx, at the request of the sender. No authentication of email addresses has been performed.

(Please do not reply to this email address since it is not monitored for responses).”

Report to FedEx?

I won’t bother to try to figure out how to report this to FedEx. They’ve probably already received a gazillion alerts and are already on top of it. If this were from someone I knew personally, I’d let them know.

Be careful out there. Keep an eye out for these five attributes in a message that just doesn’t feel right.

PEACE.

Don't Send Email Messages Full of >>>

One of my email pet peeves is to receive a message from someone and it’s chocked full of carets (<>>>). With some Web-based email solutions, messages you reply to might end up with them. Clean that mess up before you send it on to someone else!

Here’s how step by step, and I’ve added a video below.

In Outlook 2007, use the Find and Replace command to find carets and replace all of them with nothing.

  1. Select the text in the email message that’s infested with the carets.
  2. Press and hold down your Ctrl key and type H (Ctrl+H).
  3. In the Find what box, type >. Leave the Replace with box empty (to replace > with nothing).
  4. Click Replace All, OK.

If you end up with blank spaces at the beginning of each line, the following trick will eliminate it.

  1. Select all the text you just changed.
  2. Press Ctrl+E to center it, then press Ctrl+L to left-align it. All extra spaces will be gone.

If you wouldn’t send a letter on your company stationery infested with junky characters, then don’t do it in email.

Here’s a How-To Video


PEACE.

 

Going Digital and Dumping that Paper Calendar

I’ve written before about dumping paper management systems and going digital. I recently received this testimonial from Peg Corwin of SCORE Chicago on her experiences doing that, using my book on Outlook 2007 as a guide.

The following is Peg’s experience in her own words. If you have any questions, please leave a comment.

You are transforming my life.  You have pushed me from paper to paperless with the task and calendar management chapters in your Conquer Email Overload.  I must have read both three times already, and I pick up additional tips each time.

I decided to tackle the changeover when I had an opportunity to install a second monitor.  For me, this was essential.  I need quick access to my to-do list and calendar without interrupting my work.

I love your suggestion about using the Notes section of a contact for passwords on my airline accounts, for example.  And I’m now creating a task and chunking it into subprojects in the text area, crossing them off and moving the task forward to the next deadline.  I’ve always been a big list maker, and now I love adding new tasks quickly in calendar view.  I’ve also finally got the hang of dragging an email to the task list and calendar.

While email overload was not my problem, taking advantage of tasks and the calendar was.  And you explained it all.  A BIG thank you for making me more focused and productive.

Peg Corwin, Counselor with SCORE Chicago   www.scorechicago.org

I LOVE Email Campaign Kicks Off October 1st

Email gets a bum rap. People complain about it all the time. It’s not email that’s the problem, but rather bad email habits and management. Think about all the good it does and the time it saves.


The I LOVE EMAIL CAMPAIGN will consist of a series Webinars (on Mondays), workshops (on Tuesdays), and media interviews conducted by Peggy Duncan, email overload expert and author of Conquer Email Overload with Better Habits, Etiquette, and Outlook 2007. Peggy, who is a time management expert, will also travel around the country speaking at conferences and training business professionals.

I cannot imagine managing my time or my life without the wonders of email. How do you feel about it? I hear a lot of bum statements about it. The next time you complain about email, think about where you’d be without it. It has many benefits such as the following.

  • Eliminates phone tag. You can say everything you need to say in an email message and not have to worry about someone leaving out important details.
  • Reaches volumes of people quickly. Everyone will get the same message and be on the same page.
  • Establishes a “paper” trail. No need to worry about recipients having convenient amnesia. You have the proof in writing.
  • Connects it with your calendar, tasks, and contacts. Move a message from the Inbox to where it needs to be with a click of a button or the flick of the mouse.

Campaign Kicks Off October 1st!

Reduce the Load with Better Management
If email overload is a problem, reduce the load. Get into a meeting with your Inbox, clean it out, send people what they need, and move the messages to where they need to be.

  • Eliminate junk email so you’re only managing legitimate mail.
  • Redirect messages with rules based on content, origin, and importance.
  • Categorize messages and view them in batches with one click.
  • Remember to do the work using flags, Tasks, and the Calendar.
  • File the ones you need to keep. Clean out that mess that’s already there.
    Stop using your Inbox for long-term storage and keep it to one screen.

Your Inbox is not a to do list for unfinished work, tickler file that reminds you of work, calendar with meeting notices and reminders, database for addresses and phone numbers, or filing system for unfinished projects.

Improve Your Email Culture with Better Habits
Developing better email habits will help improve email management. Ask people around you for a list of their email pet peeves…things you do in email that ticks them off. Pay attention to what they say do better. Avoid doing the following.

  • Sending or responding to all when all do not need to know.
  • Trying to solve complex issues instead of picking up the phone.
  • Not matching the subject line to the message. I should know exactly what your message is about by looking at the subject line. Would you send a letter on your company letterhead that reads RE: ABC and then proceed to discuss DEF?
  • Sending one word email replies that say “thanks.” Thank them in advance when you send the initial request.

Don’t Just Upgrade Your Software: Learn How to Use It Too
Training is the first thing to go when the economy dips when it should be expanded. You’ll work more efficiently and make fewer mistakes. Without the proper training, you’re taking hours to do something you can finish before you blink.

Change your habits, your culture, and how you manage email and learn to love it more every day. Visit www.DigitalBreakthroughs.com for details on training.

Want Training?
Download my
brochure.

PEACE.

BOOK TOUR – Don't Just Upgrade to Outlook 2007: Learn How to Use It Too!

Call to Schedule Training

Now that you’ve invested in this powerful software, let it help you work smarter…learn how to use it. I’m ready to do a book tour that will include training. Whether it’s a brown bag during lunch or after hours, a Webinar, a seminar, or a hands-on workshop, you’ll enjoy learning Outlook from a time management expert’s perspective instead of just learning the different command. See this previous post to see what I mean.

To accommodate busy schedules and these tough economic times, training is available to fit any budget and can be arranged to fit any schedule. All links and details are on the Web at www.DigitalBreakthroughs.com/LearnOutlook.htm.

I read those 600-lb computer books and pull out the best tips and tricks….explained in plain English and delivers with pizzazz!

  • Buy the book. My new book is packed with Outlook tips and tricks and is written as if I’m helping you right at your desk. Check out the table of contents for Conquer Email Overload with Outlook 2007.
  • Schedule a brown bag at your office (or ours). If your organization has the space for a brown bag, it’s easy to schedule during lunch or after hours. If you don’t have space, use ours. Book purchase requested.
  • Attend Webinar. Attend a low-cost, high value Webinar most Mondays from 1:30PM-2:30PM Eastern.
  • Attend Full Day Workshop at our office. Outlook training is scheduled regularly at The Digital Breakthroughs Institute. Training includes copy of book.
  • Bring me to your location. I’m traveling internationally so don’t hesitate to ask.

Stop right now and schedule a brown bag, a Webinar, or a hands-on workshop. Visit www.DigitalBreakthroughs.com/LearnOutlook.htm for more information or call 404-492-8197.

PEACE.

Use Outlook Contacts for More Than Just Names and Addresses, etc.

You can use Outlook Contacts for more than just contact information of people you know or meet. I use them for all kinds of things because it’s so convenient to get to (I live in Outlook). I use the notes block on the contact page to store information. I give each “contact” a logical name and locate it quickly by typing in the Find a Contact box.

Here are some examples.

Blog This. As I think of things to write about (or run across ideas on the Net, magazines, etc.), I add information on various topics in the notes block of this contact. I use two monitors so when I see something on the Net to blog about, I copy and paste the URL to the text area. If it’s something I need to remind myself of, Ctrl+Shift+G to flag the contact. I assigned this contact to my Outlook “Reminder” category.

Airlines. I have the major airlines that I fly listed, along with their phone numbers, URLs, my frequent flyer numbers, and airport codes in this contact. I assigned this contact to the “Vendor” category.
Affiliates. I’ve signed up for various affiliate programs on the Web, and all the information on each one is kept in one place in this contact. Everything is in alphabetical order. I assigned this contact to the “Vendor” category.
Personal. This is a running list of all my passwords/IDs I use on various Websites. I’ve written enough of each password so I know immediately which one I used. Everything is in alphabetical order (I can also press F4 to Find). I assigned this contact to the “Personal” category.
Laptop. This contact lists all kinds of things associated with my laptop. I have the order number/date of purchase, service code/tag (because HP will ask me this if I call them); the date my warranty expires, and case number with notes anytime I have to call them. I assigned this contact to the “Vendor” category.

These are just a few examples. If you have miscellaneous information you have to keep track of, consider making it one of your contacts and it’ll always be at your fingertips (and synched to your PDA).

Note: Outlook Notes work well too. They can be organized and categorized for easy access.

PEACE.

Peggy Duncan, personal productivity expert